Depending on weather conditions and seasonal climate the quantity of our wild Shetland botanicals varies from year to year giving each “Vintage” distillation its own unique flavour signature.

Our Shetland Botanicals

Botanical-angelica1

ANGELICA

Growing for thousands of years, it is one of the key ingredients you have to use to make a true gin. The plant is native to temperate and subarctic regions of the North Hemisphere and is found as far North as Iceland and Lapland. To make Blackwoods Vintage Dry Gin we use the root of the Angelica plant to add flavour and assist in the binding of other oils. This plant isn’t just used to make gin; it has healing powers and is used as a remedy for digestion and colds.

Botanical-seapink

SEA PINK

You will find Sea Pink lighting up the un-grazed cliff tops of Shetland. Some have described the plant as a ‘lollipop,’ due to its short stem and prominent round pink flower that grows from late May through to early July. This rugged coastal plant doesn’t shy away from poor soil or exposed sites, it can even take a good lashing from the wind which makes it a rather suited inhabitant for the Shetland Islands. We use Sea Pink because it adds gentle fascination to other elements of Juniper and Angelica Root.

Marsh Marigold

MARSH MARIGOLD

The golden cups of Marsh Marigold brighten up many a dull day in Shetland. It is a large, almost luxuriant version of its smaller cousin (the buttercup), with bright yellow flowers and dark shiny leaves. It is one of the oldest plants in Great Britain, thought to have begun flourishing shortly after the ice age. Its distinctive flower blooms early from April to June and thrives in wetland. We use the flower from the marigold to add subtle citrus flavours to our gin.

Botanical-meadowsweet1

MEADOWSWEET

Meadow Sweet has a very sweet scented flower that smells of honey and you see this come through in our gin. This plant loves damp soil and will grow anywhere where there is water. In Shetland we find them by the beautiful deep blue lakes and damp meadows. Before its classification it was called Spiraea Ulmaria, which is where the name Aspirin comes from. Chemists found that Meadow Sweet contains acetylsalicylic acid, which is what Aspirin is made from.

Other Botanicals Used

Botanical-juniper1

JUNIPER

Juniper of course (but not as much as you will find in any other gin).

corriander

CORIANDER

A traditional ingredient of dry gin. Coriander seeds are believed to contain anxiolytic properties and offer up aromatic tones of sage, ginger and citrus.

citrus peel

CITRUS PEEL

We use the finest citrus peel to add a fresh taste to our gin and lift the flavours of our other botanicals.

cinanmon

CINNAMON

We use a touch of cinnamon along with other botanicals to give Blackwood’s it’s own distinct taste.

Liquorice

LIQUORICE

Liquorice is derived from the Ancient Greek words for “sweet root”. The root is boiled to obtain an extract used as a flavouring. Its flavour is similar to anise, star anise, fennel and tarragon.

nutmeg

NUTMEG

The addition of nutmeg adds a subtle exotic aroma.